highly insulating alkane rings with destructive σ-interference
The blue star signs of saturated alkane rings show exponentially decay conductance and the decay trend is similar to saturated alkane chains, which is presented by orange squares. The alkane rings are more insulating than alkane chains when compare the identical molecular length. Credit: Science China Press

Destructive quantum interference (DQI) provides the possibility to significantly suppress the leakage current in the OFF state of molecular devices. However, the DQI in π-conjugated molecules cannot exhibit ultralow conductance due to the existence of covalently bonded σ-transport channels.

Thus, suppressing the σ-contribution via σ-DQI is essential. In this work, researchers proposed the symmetric alkane ring CnCn (n = 6, 8 or 10) molecules, which were synthesized, and the corresponding electrical properties were measured.

Comparing the results with the alkane chain Cn (n = 6, 8 or 10) molecules, the alkane rings show lower conductance which contradicts the conductance superposition law in multi-channeled systems. Combined theoretical calculations reveal that the gauche conformation in a shorter chain fixed by another chain leads to decreased conductance in alkyl rings, which originates from the phase-coherent tunneling and DQI in σ-conjugated systems.

The finding suggests that through appropriate conformation locking by cyclization, the covalent alkane system can exhibit DQI, which offers strategies for future designs of molecular electronic devices and materials.

This study was led by Dr. Junyang Liu and Prof. Wenjing Hong from Xiamen University. The molecular synthesis was done by Prof. Zhong-Ning Chen (State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences) and the theoretical calculation was processed by Dr. Ali Ismael and Prof. Colin Lambert (Lancaster University).

The research was published in Science China Chemistry. More information: Jingyao Ye et al, Highly insulating alkane rings with destructive σ-interference, Science China Chemistry (2022). DOI: 10.1007/s11426-022-1341-y Provided by Science China Press Citation: Highly insulating alkane rings with destructive σ-interference (2022, August 16) retrieved 16 August 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-08-highly-insulating-alkane-destructive-interference.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

TECH NEWS RELATED

New cleaning technique boosts electronic and photonic prospects of aluminum nitride

Cross-sectional microscopy images of molecular beam epitaxy-grown aluminum nitride on aluminum nitride templates. The black squares in (A) and (E) mark the regions where the corresponding magnified images (B to D and F to H) are taken. The white notches in (A) and (E) indicate the growth interfaces. The ...

View more: New cleaning technique boosts electronic and photonic prospects of aluminum nitride

Utilizing chemo-mechanical oscillations to mimic protocell behavior in manufactured microcapsules

Credit: Oleg E. Shklyaev et al, Matter (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.matt.2022.06.063 The complexity of life on Earth was derived from simplicity: From the first protocells to the growth of any organism, individual cells aggregate into basic clumps and then form more complex structures. The earliest cells lacked complicated biochemical machinery; ...

View more: Utilizing chemo-mechanical oscillations to mimic protocell behavior in manufactured microcapsules

Research team develops a cleaner, more cost-effective way to make useful industrial chemicals

Credit: Tony Jin et al, Angewandte Chemie International Edition (2022). DOI: 10.1002/anie.202207206 Two renewable resources—cellulose from wood pulp and chitin from the shells of crabs, lobsters and other crustaceans—are known to industrial chemists for their potential for creating highly versatile nanocrystals, useful for making pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, industrial additives and ...

View more: Research team develops a cleaner, more cost-effective way to make useful industrial chemicals

3M hopes its new powder can help unlock green hydrogen production

3M senior research scientist Andy Steinbach held a catalyst powder that promises to unlock lower-cost green hydrogen production. Credit: 3M A material 3M has been working on for decades could be key to unlocking cost-effective production of green hydrogen, a promising but expensive renewable fuel source. The product—3M nanostructured-supported ...

View more: 3M hopes its new powder can help unlock green hydrogen production

Europe can rapidly eliminate imports of Russian natural gas, say researchers

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Using a new power sector model, a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has proposed a method for Europe to eliminate natural gas imports from Russia. The team’s commentary article, “Europe’s way out: Tools to rapidly eliminate imports ...

View more: Europe can rapidly eliminate imports of Russian natural gas, say researchers

Judge says Twitter-Musk trial still on track

Neither Twitter nor Elon Musk have asked the court to put the case on hold, so the judge ruled she would ‘continue to press on toward our trial’ The judge presiding over Twitter’s legal battle to hold Elon Musk to his $44-billion buyout deal said Wednesday the case was ...

View more: Judge says Twitter-Musk trial still on track

Climate change made summer drought 20 times more likely

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Drought that stretched across three continents this summer—drying out large parts of Europe, the United States and China—was made 20 times more likely by climate change, according to a new study. Drought dried up major rivers, destroyed crops, sparked wildfire, threatened aquatic species and led ...

View more: Climate change made summer drought 20 times more likely

Study: Removing GRE requirement does not undermine student success

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain In 2019, Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) eliminated the Graduate Record Examination as a requirement for admission to the school’s graduate programs for a pilot period of three years. The school’s decision was fueled by a growing body of data that indicated that ...

View more: Study: Removing GRE requirement does not undermine student success

Earth System Grid Federation launches effort to upgrade climate projection data system

Some everyday materials have memories, and now they can be erased

Shocking Study Finds Decreased Proteins – Not Amyloid Plaques – Cause Alzheimer’s Disease

Logging down the value chain raises future forest sustainability concerns

SpaceX capsule heads to space station ferrying NASA crew and Russian

Documentary featuring Professor Sara Seager wins Emmy Award

Petting Dogs Engages the Social Brain, According to Neuroimaging

Do You Act Before You Think or Think Before You Act?

A Possible Brain Mechanisms Behind COVID-19 Delirium

Researchers develop new tool for targeted cell control

Twitter Now Lets You Combine Images, Videos and GIFs in One Tweet

VPN Demand Surges in Iran as Protests Continue, Researchers Say

OTHER TECH NEWS

Top Car News Car News