make cooking safe for all, including those in developing countries, say indoor air pollution experts
Location map showing the cities where the 60 low-income homes were situated. The tables around the map show the types of cooking fuel and ventilation in the kitchens. Dhaka (DAC), Chennai (CHE), Nanjing (NKG), Medellín (MDE), São Paulo (SAO), Cairo (CAI), Sulaymaniyah (SUL), Addis Ababa (ADD), Blantyre (BLZ), Nairobi (NBO), Akure (AKR) and Dar-es-Salaam (DAR). Credit: Journal of Building Engineering (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jobe.2022.105254

Developing countries should focus on keeping unnecessary occupants, such as children, out of kitchens during cooking to help reduce their exposure to dangerous levels of air pollution, recommends a study by the University of Surrey.

Researchers from Surrey’s Global Centre for Clean Air Research (GCARE) also highlighted the benefits of using cleaner fuels and electric appliances that help reduce carbon dioxide levels within a kitchen by more than 32 percent, compared to the use of polluting fuels.

Professor Prashant Kumar, lead author and the founding director of GCARE at the University of Surrey, says that they “appreciate some of our recommendations might be less feasible for low-income households in studied countries—but we felt it critical to arm people with the knowledge and awareness to encourage governments and aid organizations to directly support more sustainable and higher impact interventions.”

“As a result, we hope that decision-makers in many of these countries would now begin the foundational work of promoting cleaner fuels for cooking and safer habits within kitchens.”

The study is the first to monitor 60 low-income kitchens across Asia, South America, the Middle East and Africa for carbon dioxide exposure, ventilation and thermal comfort.

The GCARE researchers and their partners found that kitchens that regularly had more than two people present during cooking sessions exhibited higher carbon dioxide levels.

The team found that cooking resulted in an average increase of 22 percent in carbon dioxide levels across the 60 homes.

Kitchens with their doors and windows open, that also used extractor fans during cooking were found to be the environments with optimal thermal comfort conditions. Having both kitchen doors and windows open during cooking was shown to reduce carbon dioxide levels by 14 percent when compared with environments that only kept their doors open.

Professor Maria de Fatima Andrade, co-author from the University of Sao Paulo, added that she believes “that this study is critical to women’s rights as the majority of people involved in cooking in these regions are women and their children. It is important that people living with these severe health risks are better informed and equipped with the knowledge to protect themselves.”

Professor Araya Asfaw, another co-author from Addis Adaba University, says that “sadly, 25 percent of the studied kitchens exceeded safe carbon dioxide levels. So, the simple act of cooking is a hazard for many people in these regions. Nevertheless, we found that larger kitchens with areas exceeding 46 square meters experience 28 percent less carbon dioxide levels compared to smaller ones.”

The study has been published in the Journal of Building Engineering. More information: Prashant Kumar et al, CO2 exposure, ventilation, thermal comfort and health risks in low-income home kitchens of twelve global cities, Journal of Building Engineering (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jobe.2022.105254 Provided by University of Surrey Citation: Make cooking safe for all, including those in developing countries, say indoor air pollution experts (2022, September 29) retrieved 29 September 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-09-cooking-safe-countries-indoor-air.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

TECH NEWS RELATED

Exclusive: Swiggy may fire 250 employees in December, more layoffs possible in coming months

ETtechFood and grocery delivery company Swiggy is laying off up to 250 employees this month, which is about 3-5% of its workforce, five people aware of the development told ET.Two of the sources said the layoffs could go beyond 250 in coming months while another said people across supply chain, ...

View more: Exclusive: Swiggy may fire 250 employees in December, more layoffs possible in coming months

Social platforms flag age-gating fears in MeitY’s IT rules meet

ETtechSome social media and internet platforms have expressed concerns to the ministry of electronics and IT on certain provisions of the draft Digital Personal Data Protection (DPDP) Bill which includes age-gating, sources said. The Bill has defined a child as a person who is below the age of 18 and ...

View more: Social platforms flag age-gating fears in MeitY’s IT rules meet

Spice Money to offer B2B transactions on ONDC next quarter

ETtechSpice Money (a bootstrapped subsidiary of DiGiSPICE Technologies), one of the five buyer applications on the government-backed e-commerce platform the Open Network for Digital Commerce (ONDC) is going to foray into B2B business on the network next quarter with the electronics category.So far, the transactions on the network have been ...

View more: Spice Money to offer B2B transactions on ONDC next quarter

iPhone 14’s Emergency SOS via satellite feature may launch in the UK next week

Apple has promised that its Emergency SOS via satellite feature, an exclusive safety feature for the iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro, would launch in four more countries by the end of the year. It seems we may have a launch date for one of those countries. As reported ...

View more: iPhone 14’s Emergency SOS via satellite feature may launch in the UK next week

New kilonova has astronomers rethinking what we know about gamma-ray bursts

Long gamma-ray burst stems from neutron star merger, not usual supernova explosion.

View more: New kilonova has astronomers rethinking what we know about gamma-ray bursts

Tecno MegaBook S1 brings 15.6″ 120Hz display and 12th Gen Core i7

Today was a big day for Tecno as the company presented its very first flagship phones – Tecno Phantom X2 and Phantom X2 Pro. These devices come with compelling specs such as Dimensity 9000, 120 Hz OLED displays, and capable cameras. The Pro has the first retractable portrait camera on ...

View more: Tecno MegaBook S1 brings 15.6″ 120Hz display and 12th Gen Core i7

Mars is hiding exciting mysteries beneath its surface 

A group of scientists from the University of Arizona has challenged the current views on the evolution of Martian geodynamics. A new report from the researchers suggests that Mars’ interior is far more active than previously believed, and that a giant mantle plume is currently lifting the surface upward, causing ...

View more: Mars is hiding exciting mysteries beneath its surface 

Dyson's noise-cancelling, air-purifying headphones are finally coming to Singapore

Remember the Dyson Zone? That strange-looking headphone that actually has active noise-cancellation and a built-in air purifier? It has gone into production, and it's coming to Singapore sometime in January. We now also have more details about the product. Let's talk about the headphone aspect of the Zone first. ...

View more: Dyson's noise-cancelling, air-purifying headphones are finally coming to Singapore

SpaceX announces Starshield, a new satellite service for governments

Microsoft Teams launches Communities feature to take on Discord

US state of Indiana sues TikTok, alleging Chinese access to user data

Redmi K60 with SD8 Gen 2, Pro with SD8+ Gen 1, seriously?

Cleaning Up Toxic “Protein Clumps” Could Prevent Dementia

Ex-Theranos exec Sunny Balwani sentenced to nearly 13 years in prison

New bot ChatGPT will force colleges to get creative to prevent cheating, experts say

OpenAI’s latest chatbot is sending Chinese users into a frenzy even though it is officially unavailable in the country

Oppo Find N2 and N2 Flip to come on December 15

Invisible skin mites called Demodex almost certainly live on your face – but what about your mascara?

Can machines invent things without human help? These AI examples show the answer is ‘yes’

The oldest DNA ever found reveals a snapshot of a vanished world

OTHER TECH NEWS

Top Car News Car News