Russia launches Nauka module to space station after years of delay

After years of delays, Russia launched a new multipurpose laboratory module named Nauka to the International Space Station on Wednesday from Kazakhstan.

A Russian Proton-M rocket carrying the module lifted off about10:58 a.m. EDT from Russia’s Baikonur Cosmodrome. The mission reached a successful orbit, according to NASA.

Besides a laboratory, whose name means “science” in English, the 20-ton, 43-foot-long module has a living area for one additional Russian crew member, a second toilet for the cosmonauts aboard the space station, additional oxygen generation and urine recycling capacity. Eventually, it will be used as an airlock for spacewalks.

“This is the first time a Proton rocket … launched a module to the International Space Station since the launch of the Zvezda module 21 years ago,” a NASA mission control announcer in Houston said during a live broadcast of the launch.

The Nauka Multipurpose Laboratory Module, or MLM, will spend the next eight days boosting its orbit to reach the space station, which is about 260 miles high.

Russia began to build Nauka in 1995. After delays in construction, the Russian space agency Roscosmos aimed for a 2007 launch date.

As the schedule dragged on, Russian space experts said in 2013 that metal chips had been found in the module’s fuel system, requiring a complete overhaul of that system.

In 2020, the Russian news agency TASS announced an additional delay of several months due to adjustments required on the module’s fuel tanks.

The launch of Nauka comes just months after reports emerged in April that Russian government officials were talking about leaving the space station by 2025.

Members of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, however, said July 15 that the launch indicates continued Russian commitment to the space station.

Before Nauka can dock with the space station, another Russian segment, the Pirs Docking Compartment, will be removed by a Russian Progress spacecraft Friday.

The spacecraft then will guide the compartment into the atmosphere in which both are expected to burn up during the heat of re-entry, according to NASA.

The mission control announcer said Wednesday that the Pirs compartment had been a “venerable workhorse” for the Russians, providing access to space for spacewalks and other services.

Nauka’s docking is scheduled for 9:25 a.m. EDT July 29.

After the Pirs is gone, the space station’s robotic crane, Canadarm-2, will take video of the exposed port to ensure it is ready for Nauka, NASA said.

“That video will be analyzed by Russian flight controllers, and if they see anything untoward, such as debris … consideration could be given to conduct a contingency spacewalk on Tuesday” to clear the debris, the announcer said.


Japan travel news, japan travel guides, japan holiday destinations and japan reviews

LATEST NEWS

NEWS RELATED

Geologists take Earth's inner temperature using erupted sea glass

If the Earth’s oceans were drained completely, they would reveal a massive chain of undersea volcanoes snaking around the planet. This sprawling ocean ridge system is a product of overturning material in the Earth’s interior, where boiling temperatures can melt and loft rocks up through the crust, splitting the sea…

Read more: Geologists take Earth's inner temperature using erupted sea glass

Kitchen robot in Riga cooks up new future for fast food

A pasta order comes in and the robotic arm springs into action at the Roboeatz eatery in Riga. After five minutes of gyrations, a piping hot plate is ready. The Riga cafe, located under a crumbling concrete bridge, is designed in such a way that customers can observe the robotic…

Read more: Kitchen robot in Riga cooks up new future for fast food

Tracking the movement of a single nanoparticle

Based on the principle of interaction between matter and light, a new method has been developed to track and observe the Brownian motion of fast-moving nanometer-sized molecules, and measure the different fluorescence signals of each biological nanoparticle. The nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) system is the most commonly used nanoparticle quantification…

Read more: Tracking the movement of a single nanoparticle

U.S., Seychelles sign maritime protection agreement

A maritime governance agreement between the United States and Seychelles will preserve ecosystems and prevent crimes at sea, a U.S. 6th Fleet statement says. The agreement, titled Countering Illicit Transnational Maritime Activity Operations and signed on Tuesday, is the first bilateral maritime pact between the United States and the East…

Read more: U.S., Seychelles sign maritime protection agreement

China's space propaganda blitz endures at slick new planetarium

China has opened the doors on what it bills as the world’s largest planetarium, a slick new Shanghai facility showcasing the nation’s recent extra-terrestrial exploits while notably downplaying those of space pioneers like the United States. Beijing has spent much of this year bombarding the public with news of the…

Read more: China's space propaganda blitz endures at slick new planetarium

First test of Europe's new space brain

ESA has successfully operated a spacecraft with Europe’s next-generation mission control system for the first time. The powerful software, named the ‘European Ground System – Common Core’ (EGS-CC), will be the ‘brain’ of all European spaceflight operations in the years to come, and promises new possibilities for how future missions…

Read more: First test of Europe's new space brain

High-stakes Boeing capsule launch postponed due to mishap at ISS

Boeing and NASA postponed the launch the company’s Starliner space capsule to the International Space Station on Friday after a mishap at the orbital laboratory on Thursday. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket had been scheduled to launch the capsule on an uncrewed test flight from Florida. But a…

Read more: High-stakes Boeing capsule launch postponed due to mishap at ISS

Light-bending technique for wavelength conversion may boost imaging technologies

Electrical engineers at UCLA have used a new light-bending technique to convert the wavelengths of light, a breakthrough that could boost the performance of many optical technologies. Lightwave frequency conversion is key for a variety of imaging and sensing technologies, but the process is often inefficient, adding bulk and complexity…

Read more: Light-bending technique for wavelength conversion may boost imaging technologies

Russia's Nauka science module docks with ISS

US watchdog upholds SpaceX's Moon lander contract

World's first commercial re-programmable satellite blasts into space

Airbus completes integration of 3rd Copernicus Sentinel-2

Ball Aerospace completes preliminary design review of NOAA's Space Weather Satellite

Inmarsat unveils the communications network of the future

Lift off for UK spaceflight as regulations passed

Metallic glass gears up for 'Cobots,' Coatings, and More

OTHER NEWS