climate, cop26, climate change

A few years ago, scientists proposed a ludicrous idea to help cut down on global temperature changes. The idea was to take planes and spew reflective particles into the Earth’s atmosphere yearly. These particles would then reflect solar light, effectively dimming the Sun. Some think it could help cut down on climate change a lot. But others aren’t quite as convinced.

Is dimming the Sun the answer to climate change?

☀️ Could “dimming the sun” help turn down global heating?🌡 It might sound like science fiction, but some are exploring solar geoengineering tech to stop temperatures rising. ⭕️ They say it's relatively cheap and simple – while others warn it could be catastrophic. Why? 🧵 pic.twitter.com/4PoNthWims

— TRF Climate (@TRF_Climate) July 28, 2022

Climate change is a very real problem. Thawing permafrost continues to open cavernous “mouths to hell,” and even NASA has created images to represent the ongoing temperature changes our planet is seeing. Many have been looking for ways to stop, or at least slow, climate change. And, based on recent reports, it looks like dimming the Sun is back on the list of options.

The Thomson Reuters Foundation posted a new report, as well as a thread on Twitter, talking about the idea. According to Emmi Yonekura, a researcher on the risks of climate “geoengineering.” But, from the sounds of it, Yonekura only sees it as an option if other plans to cut emissions fall short.

That’s because many see the potential of dimming the Sun as too risky. The technology essentially mimics the sky-darkening effect of volcanic eruptions. By doing that, it keeps sunlight from entering Earth’s atmosphere and increasing the global temperature. And it could work, scientists say. But, there are also a large number of risks involved, too.

Unpredictable changes

climate, cop26, climate change

A visualization of the global temperature changes from the 1880s to 2021. Image source: NASA / YouTube

Battling climate change has become a primary issue for many, including the United Nations. And we have even seen possible ideas from MIT and others to use “space bubbles” to buffer solar light hitting Earth. Countless attempts have been made to cut down on fossil fuels and other potentially hazardous substances.

So where exactly does dimming the sun fit into all of this? Well, the idea first popped up a few years ago. Some studies and outdoor tests began on the tech, but ultimately it was shot down by those concerned with the risks it poses. Now, though, it has resurfaced. And that’s because scientists believe that it could hold down global average temperatures.

Those temperatures are steadily increasing. We could see an increase of 1.5 degrees Celsius over the next five years, which could cause catastrophic changes worldwide. Perhaps some of the biggest concerns surrounding solar geoengineering is that it could cause potential shifts in rainfall patterns. This could then lead to increased issues with global hunger.

It’s also possible that solar geoengineering could lead to a rapid and uncontrollable increase in temperature if it were stopped suddenly. And, some worry it would give climate polluters, like fossil fuel companies, a green light to carry on without and change. Dimming the Sun could help hold global temperatures, or it could perhaps doom us all. Sadly, it’s impossible to say which is truer.

TECH NEWS RELATED

No, the Human Brain Did Not Shrink 3,000 Years Ago

Summary: Researchers question the widely held belief that modern humans experienced an evolutionary decrease in brain size. Source: UNLV Did the 12th century B.C.E. — a time when humans were forging great empires and developing new forms of written text — coincide with an evolutionary reduction in brain size? Think ...

View more: No, the Human Brain Did Not Shrink 3,000 Years Ago

This Week @NASA: New Image From Webb Telescope, Previewing Artemis I Moon Mission

Previewing our Artemis I mission to the Moon … A new image from our James Webb Space Telescope … And an anniversary for one of our explorers on Mars … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! NASA Previews Artemis I Moon Mission ...

View more: This Week @NASA: New Image From Webb Telescope, Previewing Artemis I Moon Mission

iPaaS, low-code platform sales to hit double-digit growth in 2022

iPaaS is expected to enter mainstream adoption maturity by the end of 2022.

View more: iPaaS, low-code platform sales to hit double-digit growth in 2022

Microsoft launches .NET Community Toolkit

Collection of .NET libraries originally developed for the Windows Community Toolkit can now be used regardless of UI framework.

View more: Microsoft launches .NET Community Toolkit

Cisco's networking chief Todd Nightingale to helm Fastly

Cisco said it will its enterprise and carrier groups under Jonathan Davidson, the current head of the carrier group.

View more: Cisco's networking chief Todd Nightingale to helm Fastly

Palo Alto debuts Unit 42 team for on-demand cyber security

Live expert service builds on Palo Alto’s Cortex extended detection and response (XDR) platform to provide more personalised, effective warnings.

View more: Palo Alto debuts Unit 42 team for on-demand cyber security

Apple warns its suppliers about China following Pelosi Taiwan visit

Ripple effects are continuing to multiply after the controversial visit of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to Taiwan just a few days ago. That visit sparked furious saber-rattling from China, for example, and even had some people fretting about WWIII. Fortunately, the worst-case fears about the Pelosi Taiwan visit ...

View more: Apple warns its suppliers about China following Pelosi Taiwan visit

If markets can’t be trusted to invest wisely, governments should step in

The financial world needs to stop playing the game of stock markets and get serious about how it invests money. Market players who engage in a constant game of “chips in, chips out and chips in again” are not the kind of people we need to be exercising stewardship ...

View more: If markets can’t be trusted to invest wisely, governments should step in

A brief history of Esperanto, the 135-year-old language hated by Hitler and Stalin

James Gunn says Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 3. will be ‘incredibly emotional’

Spider One on welcoming the challenge of directing the horror film Allegoria

Samsung’s Galaxy Z Fold 4 Won’t Have an S Pen Slot

Harvard scientists closer to solving centuries-old heart mystery

Fintech platform Scripbox makes strategic investment in Pune-based Wealth Managers

Russians Building a Satellite-Blinding Laser – An Expert Explains the Ominous Technology

Podcast #688 – Intel & AMD Financials, Ryzen 7000 Date, be quiet! Pure Base 500 FX, Sonos, 0-Day Hacks + MORE!

Samsung Galaxy Watch 5 Rumors: Will It Have Better Battery Life?

Apple Delays iPadOS 16 Software Update To Focus on iPhone 14

40-Year Mystery: Doctors Solve a Case of Unexplained Finger Pain

Smart Omega Athletes Win in School and Gaming

OTHER TECH NEWS

Top Car News Car News