Summary: The smell of fresh cut grass or blooming flowers appears to have a positive effect on a person’s overall well-being, a new study reveals. Researchers say the smells of nature can help boost psychological well-being.

Source: University of Kent

Smells experienced in nature can make us feel relaxed, joyful, and healthy, according to new research led by the University of Kent’s Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE).

Smells were found to play an important role in delivering well-being benefits from interacting with nature, often with a strong link to people’s personal memories, and specific ecological characteristics and processes (e.g. fallen leaves rotting in the winter).

Nature is known to play an integral role in promoting human health and well-being, shown especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, previous research has been limited in investigating which attributes of nature (e.g. smells, sounds, colors) affect human well-being and why.

This study published by Ambio examines the role of smell in influencing well-being through nature.

Researchers found that smells affected multiple types of human well-being, with physical well-being noted most frequently, particularly in relation to relaxation, comfort and rejuvenation.

Absence of smell was also perceived to improve physical well-being, providing a cleansing environment due to the removal of pollution and unwanted smells associated with urban areas, and therefore enabling relaxation.

Relaxation reduces stress and lowers cortisol levels, which is often linked to a multitude of diseases, and so these findings could be particularly significant to public health professionals.

Smells Experienced in Nature Evoke Positive Well-being

Nature is known to play an integral role in promoting human health and well-being. Image is in the public domain

The research, carried out in woodland settings across four seasons, also found that smells evoked memories related to childhood activities. Many participants created meaningful connections with particular smells, rather than the woodland itself, and associated this with a memorable event. This, in turn, appeared to influence well-being by provoking emotional reactions to the memory.

The study was co-led by Dr. Jessica Fisher, a Postdoctoral Research Associate at DICE. She says that “nature is a multisensory experience and our research demonstrates the potential significance of smell for well-being.”

“The study provides findings that can inform the work of practitioners, public health specialists, policy-makers and landscape planners looking to improve well-being outcomes through nature. Small interventions could lead to public health benefits.”

About this olfaction and well-being research news

Author: Press OfficeSource: University of KentContact: Press Office – University of Kent
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original Research: Open access.
“Nature, smells, and human wellbeing” by Phoebe R. Bentley et al. AMBIO


Abstract

Nature, smells, and human wellbeing

The link between nature and human wellbeing is well established. However, few studies go beyond considering the visual and auditory underpinnings of this relationship, even though engaging with nature is a multisensory experience.

While research linking smell to wellbeing exists, it focuses predominantly on smells as a source of nuisance/offence. Smells clearly have a prominent influence, but a significant knowledge gap remains in the nexus of nature, smell, and wellbeing.

Here, we examine how smells experienced in woodlands contribute to wellbeing across four seasons. We show that smells are associated with multiple wellbeing domains, both positively and negatively.

They are linked to memories, and specific ecological characteristics and processes over space/time. By making the link between the spatiotemporal variability in biodiversity and wellbeing explicit, we unearth a new line of enquiry.

Overall, the multisensory experience must be considered by researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and planners looking to improve wellbeing through nature.

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