While luxury electric cars are making everybody swoon, other types of electric vehicles are conducting a “quiet revolution” behind the scenes. In addition to the introduction of drones, agriculture is also about to be transformed by the latest emissions-free utility vehicles, including tractors.

ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
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ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n
ev, electric, tractor, agriculture, solectrac, e70n

Perhaps it won’t be long until most of the massive, noisy tractors that emit toxic substances will be replaced by smaller electric ones, which are better for people who work in agriculture, better for the environment, but no less powerful than conventional versions. The Monarch smart electric tractor is already famous in this sector, but there’s a new model on the market that’s ready to make waves. The Solectrac e70N is a sleek, but powerful tractor, specifically designed for vineyard operations.

Unveiled earlier this year, as the latest addition to Solectrac’s electric vehicle range, the e70N has already won an innovation award, from the Wine Industry Network (WIN). The WINnovation award will officially be presented at this year’s WIN Expo, which will take place on December 2, in Santa Rosa, California.

Santa Rosa is also where the new e70N is assembled, together with the company’s other electric vehicles. This award comes as a confirmation of the vehicle’s groundbreaking technology, combining performance with the benefits of zero emissions. The 70 hp diesel-equivalent tractor is built with a narrow body, so that it can easily navigate through narrow rows of vines, and it can operate up to eight hours, depending on the load.

It also comes with a rear 3-point hitch, compatible with all category I and II implements used for agricultural operations, boasting a lifting capacity of 2,000 lbs (907 kg). Its electric motor is not only better for the environment, but also for worker’s health. That’s because this type of work can sometimes be associated with respiratory illnesses due to the toxic emissions, and even hearing loss caused by the powerful noise of conventional tractors. The e70N’s electric motor is quiet, clean, and easy to maintain.

WIN Expo, where the new e70N will be displayed, is a great opportunity for those who will be attending to learn more about the benefits of zero-emissions vehicles for agricultural operations, and how they can switch to these innovative alternatives.

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