The United Kingdom has ruled out that AIs or artificial intelligence cannot set forth its patents or have an invention or innovation named after them after an appeal by one Dr. Stephen Thaler. The researcher has set forth several innovations to be named after the AI he used, something which is somehow unnatural for the courts. 

UK Court Rules Out AI Patents

The case of Thaler vs. Comptroller General of Patents Trade Marks and Designs has focused on the United Kingdom’s view on AI and its right to push forward an invention for society. It has examined the possibility of having an AI take credit for its work, something which was not yet that of an open possibility in the country.

uk court, uk ai patent, uk ai, artificial intelligence, ai, ai courts, ai innovations, ai invetions, uk ai patents

(Photo : Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP via Getty Images)
Offloaded Agency, is pictured during a photocall to promote the forthcoming exhibition entitled “AI: More than Human”, at the Barbican Centre in London on May 15, 2019. – Managing the health of the planet, fighting against discrimination, innovating in the arts: the fields in which artificial intelligence (AI) can help humanity are innumerable.

That being said, the “AI DABUS” or technology by Thaler, which he put down as the “inventor” of the technology that they are trying to patent, was dismissed and denied. According to Engadget, the case was raised by Thaler against UK’s Intellectual Property Office (IPO), which has initially denied his case. 

AI Inventions, Innovations

There has been a lot of research that focused on the inventions and innovations of AI, something which people have been seeing a lot during these modern times. AI is here to help humans and give them an easier life or task to fulfill and help them with inventions that they would soon put forward.

This is where the question comes, asking, “Do AIs need to be credited for their work?”

AI’s Tech is Not Yet to Replace Humans

Artificial Intelligence technologies are smart and are something that already pars or tops human intelligence for several factors, especially with the lack of emotions and hesitancy in performing a task. AI can help in bringing content for people via social media and streaming apps and can also be the focus of a lot of innovations. 

In the US, AI Patents were also denied, as a court argued that only natural people could push forward their inventions and have them named after them, and not a piece of technology. The argument comes from the fact that AI was created by humans, and it is still the intelligence of a person which made the invention possible, and not the tech. 

Several countries already support AI to push forward inventions, and while they would have different rules for that, nations like the UK and US still believe that it is too early for these types of cases. 

Written by Isaiah Richard

TECH NEWS RELATED

Fish Predators Help Control Coral-Eating Crown-of-Thorns Starfish on Great Barrier Reef

A red throat emperor (Lethrinus nebulosus) checks out the camera in front of an aggregation of crown-of-thorns starfish on the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Australian Institute of Marine Science Reef fish, such as emperors, tropical snappers, and rockcods, help keep numbers of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish in check on the ...

View more: Fish Predators Help Control Coral-Eating Crown-of-Thorns Starfish on Great Barrier Reef

Fish help control crown-of-thorns starfish numbers on Great Barrier Reef

A red throat emperor (Lethrinus nebulosus) checks out the camera in front of an aggregation of crown-of-thorns starfish on the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Australian Institute of Marine Science Reef fish, such as emperors, tropical snappers and rockcods, help keep numbers of crown-of-thorns starfish in check on the Great ...

View more: Fish help control crown-of-thorns starfish numbers on Great Barrier Reef

New research makes waves tackling the future of tsunami monitoring and modeling

Fralin Life Scientes Institutes’ Tina Dura (right) conducts research with colleagues Richard Briggs (United States Geological Survey) and Simon Engelhart (Durham University) on an island off the coast of Alaska. Photo courtesy of Rich Koehler for Virginia Tech. Credit: Virginia Tech The coastal zone is home to over a ...

View more: New research makes waves tackling the future of tsunami monitoring and modeling

Ancient DNA found in soil samples reveals mammoths, Yukon wild horses survived thousands of years longer than believed

Researchers used DNA capture-enrichment technology developed at McMaster to isolate and rebuild the fluctuating animal and plant communities during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Credit: Julius Csotonyi Mere spoonsful of soil pulled from Canada’s permafrost are opening vast windows into ancient life in the Yukon, revealing rich new information and rewriting ...

View more: Ancient DNA found in soil samples reveals mammoths, Yukon wild horses survived thousands of years longer than believed

Common diabetes drug not effective against early-stage breast cancer, researchers say

A widely used and inexpensive type 2 diabetes drug, once hoped to hold enormous promise in treating breast cancer, does not prevent or stop the spread of the most common forms of the disease, according to new research. The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, was led by Toronto ...

View more: Common diabetes drug not effective against early-stage breast cancer, researchers say

When turtles fly: Cold-stunned animals nursed in Mississippi

In this photo provided by the Mississippi Aquarium, one of 40 cold-stunned Kemp’s ridley turtles is seen that the facility is caring for. The turtles arrived in Gulfport on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021. Credit: Celeste Forcier/Mississippi Aquarium via AP Forty endangered sea turtles that were injured when the water ...

View more: When turtles fly: Cold-stunned animals nursed in Mississippi

Looted Gilgamesh tablet returns to Iraq in formal ceremony

A recovered clay tablet from the United States is displayed at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. The 3,500-year-old clay tablet bearing a portion of the Epic of Gilgamesh that was looted from an Iraqi museum 30 years ago was formally returned to Iraq ...

View more: Looted Gilgamesh tablet returns to Iraq in formal ceremony

A New Strategy to Transform Liver Cancer Immunotherapy

For most liver cancer patients, immunotherapy does not produce effective results but new data suggests a revamped strategy can make unresponsive liver tumors highly responsive In recent years, tumor immunotherapy has emerged as a highly promising and much-touted oncological approach. It is based on using humanized antibodies called immune checkpoint ...

View more: A New Strategy to Transform Liver Cancer Immunotherapy

Hawaii recoups from big storm amid lingering flood threats

Study finds future snowmelt could have costly consequences on infrastructure

Newly discovered fish songs demonstrate reef restoration success

Streetwise bees cut corners to find food

Fleshing out the bones of Quetzalcoatlus, Earth's largest flier ever

Leveraging machine learning to rapidly discover novel beneficial microbes

Japanese billionaire Maezawa blasts off to International Space Station

Chinese sighting of 'cube' on moon rouses speculation, inspires memes

Adele’s Las Vegas shows have reminded so many people why they hate Ticketmaster

Why Eraser Enzymes Go Wrong and Lead to Cancer

Machines that see the world more like humans do

Meet the Oystamaran

OTHER TECH NEWS

;