uk watchdog, cosmetic surgery

(Photo : Unsplash/ Paul Hanaoka) Cosmetic surgery

The U.K. advertising watchdog announced that they will ban all adverts for cosmetic surgeries designed to change a person’s physical appearance if it targets users who are under 18 years old. The new rule will come into full force starting May 2022.

U.K. to Ban Cosmetic Surgery Ads That Targets Minors

Companies can no longer advertise procedures like nose jobs and breast enhancements across social media platforms that people under 18 years of age use when the new rule is implemented. That also includes T.V. programs.

In the United Kingdom, it is illegal to perform cosmetic procedures on patients under 18 years of age, but there have been no restrictions on advertising it to them, according to BBC.

The decision comes after a consultation by the Committee for Advertising Practice or CAP, which writes the rules that all advertisers in the United Kingdom need to follow.

Setting the Bar High

The CAP raised concerns about the harm of advertising cosmetic changes to young people as it may cause mental health issues and body image pressures. The potential complications of the procedure are also taken into consideration.

People who are interested in getting cosmetic surgery are those who are younger, mostly minors, and those who are above the age of 40.

The Committee stated that the evidence contributed to a clearer picture showing that children and young people are vulnerable to body image pressures.

Shahriar Coupal, the CAP director, said that because of the risks of cosmetic intervention procedures and their potential appeal to young people struggling with body confidence issues, it is important that they set the bar high in terms of marketing.

The ban also covers skin rejuvenation treatments, dermal fillers and injectable treatments, chemical peels, laser, light treatments, and teeth whitening products.

Earlier this year, the Advertising Standards Authority or ASA named a couple of social media celebrities to break the advertising rules.

Luke Mabbott from Love Island, Gabby Allen, Lauren Goodger from Towie, and TikTok celebrities from The Wave House have all been asked to take some posts down because they were not labeled as adverts.

In August, ASA named four celebrities who broke the rules: Jodie Marsh, Chloe Khan, Chloe Ferry, and Lucy Mecklenburgh.

Effects of Social Media on Teenagers

Since social media platforms are more popular than ever, experts stated that it had taken its toll on its young audience, as they are forced to see perfect bodies and skin from models worldwide, and they can’t help but compare themselves to them.

According to Common Sense Media, around 75% of teenagers have social media profiles and log on to them every day. Too much online activities can cause depression and anxiety, especially if the content is not filtered.

The study also states that 1 in 4 teenagers suffer from body issues and eating disorders due to the cosmetic surgery ads and diet “tips” that they see online. Teenage girls began considering cosmetic surgery ever since selfies became popular in 2014.

Social media consumption also causes sleep deprivation. In the report that the Journal of Youth Studies posted, out of 900 teenagers that they have interviewed, one-fifth of them admitted to waking up in the middle of the night to log in to their social media account.

Written by Sophie Webster

TECH NEWS RELATED

COVID Pandemic Depression Persists Among Older Adults

Research uses data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the mental health of older people living in the community, with those who are lonely faring far worse, according to new research from McMaster University. Using data from the Canadian ...

View more: COVID Pandemic Depression Persists Among Older Adults

New Device Rapidly Detects Viruses Like COVID-19

Researchers say the device can tell with 95% percent accuracy if someone has a virus, a significant improvement over current rapid tests. University of Central Florida researchers have developed a device that detects viruses like COVID-19 in the body as fast as and more accurately than current, commonly used rapid ...

View more: New Device Rapidly Detects Viruses Like COVID-19

Plague of Justinian Was Nothing Like Flu and May Have Hit England Before Constantinople

Hand of Plague victim. Credit: CDC/ Dr. Jack Poland ‘Plague skeptics’ are wrong to underestimate the devastating impact that bubonic plague had in the 6th–8th centuries CE, argues a new study based on ancient texts and recent genetic discoveries. The same study suggests that bubonic plague may have reached ...

View more: Plague of Justinian Was Nothing Like Flu and May Have Hit England Before Constantinople

Study Finds Gradual Increase in COVID-19 Infection Risk After Second Vaccine Dose

Results confirm that protection wanes with time and suggest a third (booster) dose might be warranted A study published by The BMJ finds a gradual increase in the risk of covid-19 infection from 90 days after receiving a second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The study was carried out ...

View more: Study Finds Gradual Increase in COVID-19 Infection Risk After Second Vaccine Dose

Chewing Gum Developed That Could Reduce COVID Transmission – Laced With Protein That “Traps” the SARS-CoV-2 Virus

A chewing gum laced with a plant-grown protein serves as a “trap” for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, reducing viral load in saliva and potentially tamping down transmission, according to a new study. The work, led by Henry Daniell at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine and performed in collaboration with scientists at ...

View more: Chewing Gum Developed That Could Reduce COVID Transmission – Laced With Protein That “Traps” the SARS-CoV-2 Virus

Oops! You did it again. New test predicts if impulsivity is pathological

A new diagnostic test measures negative impulsivity based on how people react to disturbing imagery. (Photo courtesy of iStockphoto) If you can’t stop saying or doing things that you later regret, here’s a diagnostic test for you: UC Berkeley researchers have pioneered a way to better determine when acting on ...

View more: Oops! You did it again. New test predicts if impulsivity is pathological

Be grateful: It may improve your health

Silhouette of a person with arms outstretched at sunrise. Image credit: avi_acl, Pixabay.com Be thankful for what you have-it might improve your physical and mental health, according to a new global study that uses cell phone data.People who were more grateful had lower blood pressure and heart rate, as ...

View more: Be grateful: It may improve your health

Promising Alzheimer’s Treatment Found on Experimental Cancer Drug Upon Testing on Mice

A promising Alzheimer’s Disease treatment has been discovered by researchers as they were working on an experimental drug that is intended for cancer and its effects. The potential treatment was found as they were testing it on mice, showing different effects it has in the neural region, and not just ...

View more: Promising Alzheimer’s Treatment Found on Experimental Cancer Drug Upon Testing on Mice

“This Virus Is a Shape-Shifter!” – New Research Details How COVID Variants Are Evolving New Ways To Evade Vaccines

Whether people inform themselves or remain ignorant is due to three factors

A new perspective of the key moments of embryonic development

Study: COVID-19 Delta Variant Has Increased Ability To Evade Protective Response of Vaccines

Elevated Resting Heart Rate Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

CVS Pharmacy is Partnering with Microsoft to Deliver Health Care Needs Faster with Digital Platform, Cloud, and MORE

Interactive tool helps you decide how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19

The role of bitter receptors in cancer

Tracking the neurons that make us social

COVID-19 Delta variant may have increased ability to evade vaccine-induced immunity

New tool helps people decide how best to protect themselves and others from covid-19

New survey reveals pandemic impact on Canadian youth

OTHER TECH NEWS

;