zebra finches alter song to eggs during hot periods to repress heat production in embryo cells
Figure 1. Average mitochondrial rates (±s.e.) in intact red blood cells from zebra finch nestlings exposed to prenatal playbacks of either heat-calls (red) or control-calls (black) and sampled following (a) in-nest (n, heat-calls = 9, control-calls = 11) or (b) acute heat-challenge conditions (n, heat-calls = 10, control-calls = 9). O2 consumption rates are normalized by total protein content. Letters indicate significant differences (p < 0.05) between the mitochondrial rates (pooling both playback groups); ***p = 0.001, #p = 0.055 between playback groups. Credit: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2021.1893

A team of researchers from Deakin University in Australia and Clemson University in the U.S. has found that female finches change the song they sing to their eggs when temperatures rise. This results in hatchling mitochondria producing more ATP and less heat. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with captive zebra finches.

Prior research has shown that female zebra finches sing songs when nesting. In this new effort, the researchers found that in hot conditions, the finches change their tunes in a way that induces mitochondria in the cells of the embryos to produce less heat.

Mitochondria are organelles found inside cells. Part of their job is to manage the process of using the energy stored in sugars and fats to make adenosine triphosphate—the food that powers cells. They are also responsible for converting the same energy into heat. Through an unknown process, the mitochondria determine how much energy to use for making ATP and how much to use to generate heat to maintain body temperature. In this new effort, the researchers found that mother zebra finches can send signals to the mitochondria in embryo cells telling them to produce more ATP and less heat.

The researchers made this discovery by placing 111 zebra finch eggs in incubators and playing recordings of zebra finch “heat songs” for half of them and non-heat songs to the others every day until they hatched. After they hatched, the researchers placed the chicks with foster parents living in different cages heated to different temperatures. After two weeks, they collected blood samples from all of the chicks and tested them. They found that the chicks who had been exposed to heat songs as embryos produced more ATP relative to heat than did those chicks exposed to non-heat songs. The researchers suggest this shows that the mother’s heat songs served to protect their embryos from overheating during hot spells, and that the impact of the songs likely also resulted in smaller offspring. More information: Eve Udino et al, Prenatal acoustic programming of mitochondrial function for high temperatures in an arid-adapted bird, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2021). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2021.1893 Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B

© 2021 Science X Network

Citation: Zebra finches alter song to eggs during hot periods to repress heat production in embryo cells (2021, December 8) retrieved 8 December 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-12-zebra-finches-song-eggs-hot.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

TECH NEWS RELATED

Navi uses SharePlay to bring live subtitles and translation to FaceTime

Source: Good Snooze What you need to know Navi is an app that adds subtitles and translation to FaceTime calls. Using SharePlay, Navi instantly translates FaceTime calls into more than 20 languages. Navi is available for iPhone, iPad, and Mac. Apple’s addition of SharePlay with iOS 15.1 is one that ...

View more: Navi uses SharePlay to bring live subtitles and translation to FaceTime

No fourth stimulus check, but you can still get a child tax credit – read this update now

Saturday marked the first time since June of last year that millions of Americans didn’t get a monthly child tax credit on the 15th of the month. At the same time, there has been a slew of headlines for weeks about the on-again, off-again political brawl over renewing the ...

View more: No fourth stimulus check, but you can still get a child tax credit – read this update now

Best Thunderbolt 4 docks in 2022: Expand your laptop

Mobile devices and laptops are converging. Smartphones and tablets are getting increasingly functional, while laptops get slimmer and more portable. The result? While you once may have had all kinds of ports along the sides of your laptop, these days you may find that you only have a few ...

View more: Best Thunderbolt 4 docks in 2022: Expand your laptop

Ingram Micro shakes up leadership team with new global CEO

Paul Bay has been named the new global chief executive at Ingram Micro.  He replaces current CEO Alain Monié, who has transitioned to the role of executive chairman. Bay previously held the position of executive vice president and president, Global Technology Solutions. “It is with a profound sense of ...

View more: Ingram Micro shakes up leadership team with new global CEO

Out with the new, in with the old: AU consumers want longer-lasting products

Consumers are urging Australian brands to create longer-lasting products to cut down on waste and do their part for the planet, according to findings from consumer research firm InSites Consulting. The research shows that 70% of Australians have a positive affiliation with ‘extending life’ – in other words, extending ...

View more: Out with the new, in with the old: AU consumers want longer-lasting products

Indian IT service providers clean up in global cloud surge

Infosys, TCS and Wipro see revenue growth driven by focus on digital transformation and cloud.

View more: Indian IT service providers clean up in global cloud surge

WorldRemit MD reveals top digital money transfer trends for 2022

Digital money transfer numbers are expected to significantly grow in the coming year in Australia and around the world, according to WorldRemit managing director APAC Scott Eddington. In a recent analysis of trends and predictions, Eddington believes constant Covid-19 related border closures and economic struggles will further increase remittance ...

View more: WorldRemit MD reveals top digital money transfer trends for 2022

Ridley Scott thought the famous '1984' Macintosh ad was for The Beatles

Source: Apple What you need to know Apple’s ‘1984’ is a stunning ad and it was directed by Ridley Scott. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Scott explained how the 1984 ad came about. Scott says he thought he was going to be doing an ad with Apple Records ...

View more: Ridley Scott thought the famous '1984' Macintosh ad was for The Beatles

Safari 15 bug leaks browsing activity on iPhone, iPad, and Mac devices

Can NFTs be art? Wikipedia isn’t sure — and crypto bros are terrified

The mid-2012 13-inch MacBook Pro will soon be listed as vintage

Work towards a lucrative career in the blockchain, DevOps or Google cloud computing for $26

Useful Tools That Can Help Improve The Way Your Business Works

Microsoft’s wins, fails, and WTF moments of 2021

Implicating Dendritic Cells In The Pathogenesis Of Anterior Uveitis 

Solubility In Sub- And Supercritical Ethanol

Treating Sleeping Disorders Could Be As Easy As Taking Vitamin D

Plastic Mulch Increasing Water Consumption At Night In Croplands

How Many Hearts Does A Worm Really Have?

Is Methylation Of MORC1 A Depression Biomarker?

OTHER TECH NEWS

;