An artificial intelligence program currently in development could very well be the saving grace of the human race. 

artificial intelligence, ai, deep learning, algorithm, global warming, climate crisis, climate change

(Photo : Getty Images )

The results on the research of the deep-learning algorithm are being reported in a research paper, which is headed by applied mathematics professor Chris Bauch of the University of Waterloo. 

According to Phys.org, the paper is trying to look for specific climate crisis events called “tipping points,” which are situations when humanity can no longer change the course of devastating climate change. 

Bauch stated that he and his team has found that their new artificial intelligence algorithm is able to predict these tipping points more accurately than before, but also offer new information at what the state of the world will be past the tipping point. 

A few of these “tipping points” that Bauch’s team talks about include Arctic permafrost.

Their models show that should the frost keep melting at its current rate, it’s going to release massive amounts of methane gas. This could, in turn, actually speed up global warming.

Basically, nothing good ever happens beyond that. 

How Does This Artificial Intelligence Work? 

The researchers are developing their artificial intelligence algorithm rather differently to tackle this specific problem.

According to them, they programmed it to learn not only about a single type of tipping point, but also the individual characteristics of multiple ones. 

Before, scientists could only use either AI or mathematical theories to identify these tipping points. But with this new model, the artificial intelligence algorithm can “hybridize” them, essentially hitting two birds with one stone. 

Achieving this is only possible because of the insane processing power of artificial intelligence as a whole. In recent times, this tech has been making big steps in terms of identifying patterns and classifying them. 

By doing this, the artificial intelligence can raise so-called “red flags” way sooner, giving humans enough time to adapt and change things before it’s too late.

This is exactly what Bauch and his team hopes to achieve. Even if societies can’t avoid the problems, an early warning system can at least significantly lessen the damage it could cause. 

artificial intelligence, ai, deep learning, algorithm, global warming, climate crisis, climate change

(Photo : Getty Images )

AI Can Do So Much More Than Just Warnings 

Of course, the power of deep learning can’t only be applied to one thing. 

Within this growing climate crisis, artificial intelligence can see more action in other areas such as designing and building energy-efficient structures, optimizing the deployment of renewable energy, and improving power storage, according to WeForum. 

The advancement of AI technology has long been warned about by a lot of experts, including the late legendary physicist Stephen Hawking.

But other personalities, such as Google CEO Sundar Pichai, believe that artificial intelligence advancement is a far more significant human achievement than the discovery of fire and electricity. 

These are bold claims, but perhaps Pichai is correct.

Right now, a lot of the problems of the world are being tackled by learning machines that can come up with lightning-quick, long-term solutions. 

Written by RJ Pierce

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