nine out of 10 hong kong employees prefer working from home … but they may not have a choice, says pwc study

Nine out of 10 employees in Hong Kong prefer to work remotely, according to a survey by accounting giant PwC.

However, many of them may find themselves out of luck – the survey found less than half of employers are offering that option.

PwC’s Hopes & Fears 2022 report, released on Thursday, surveyed 1,043 employees across the city in March.

Eighty-nine per cent of Hongkongers polled said they would rather work entirely or mostly from home, while only 45 per cent actually have that choice.

The survey also found employees are demanding more advanced technology skills, but companies are falling behind in providing digital training.

“Employers are advised to uphold workplace flexibility and experiment with different modes of working,” said Michael Cheng, people and organisation advisory digital lead partner at PwC Hong Kong.

“Employers can continue to seek new ways of improving hybrid working experiences by providing employees with more digitalised tools and trainings, and taking a more holistic approach to addressing retention risks such as pay and career development for those who cannot work remotely or in a hybrid format.”

Standard Chartered was an early adopter of a hybrid working model, making the move in early 2021 as the Covid-19 pandemic raged. It was able to reduce its Hong Kong office space by 30 per cent to curb costs, as a result.

Another lender, DBS Bank, extended its work-from-home allowance to up to 40 per cent in last year.

Many of the city’s employers would rather see their staff back in the office once Covid-19 has subsided, however.

“In general, employers find people working from home are not as productive and responsible compared to those who work in the office,” said Simon Wong Ka-wo, the chairman of the Kampery Group, a wholesaling company.

Albert Wong, a member of CPA Australia’s Greater Bay Area committee, said remote working can be made more efficient if companies are prepared to invest in the right technology.

“Video conferencing and group collaboration tools, as well as cloud computing may help to facilitate the work-from-home environment,” said Wong.

“Employers should determine the most effective way of delivering the technology content, and collect feedback and observe if the staff really practice these digital skills.”

Hong Kong is still reeling from the worst wave of the pandemic, with the economy facing an uphill battle to recover. The office vacancy rate hit a 19-year high of 12 per cent in June, according to a midyear report by CBRE.

“Flexible working is likely to remain a global trend and will lead to slow demand growth for working in the office,” said Marcos Chan, executive director and head of research at CBRE.

However, people are likely to return to the office as quarantine measures ease and borders fully reopen, he added.

The PwC survey also highlighted a skills gap. Half of the Hong Kong employees surveyed said they found it hard to pick up technical or digital skills, higher than the average of 36 per cent globally.

Furthermore, 45 per cent said they had no opportunity to learn as companies do not provide the necessary training schemes.

“Because the impacts of technological force are felt strongly by employees, business leaders should utilise digital technologies to develop more integrated, flexible, and lower-cost tools, resources, and learning channels,” said Cheng.

TECH NEWS RELATED

What are the US audit regulator’s inspectors doing in Hong Kong?

Teams of US audit inspectors have already spent their first week at the Central offices of accounting firms PwC and KPMG reviewing hundreds of audit working papers pertaining to US-listed, mainland-based companies. The fates of more than 160 Chinese companies that face potential delisting from US exchanges are on ...

View more: What are the US audit regulator’s inspectors doing in Hong Kong?

Scientists found a bizarre new creature that looks like blue goo at the bottom of the ocean

Scientists have discovered a new bizarre underwater creature that looks like a pile of blue goo. The scientists, part of the NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer team, discovered the creature while exploring the Caribbean. The exploration detail is part of a much larger expedition called Voyage to the Ridge 2022. Scientists ...

View more: Scientists found a bizarre new creature that looks like blue goo at the bottom of the ocean

Magnetic field helps thick battery electrodes tackle electric vehicle challenges

Credit: University of Texas at Austin As electric vehicles grow in popularity, the spotlight shines more brightly on some of their remaining major issues. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are tackling two of the bigger challenges facing electric vehicles: limited range and slow recharging. The researchers ...

View more: Magnetic field helps thick battery electrodes tackle electric vehicle challenges

Philadelphia tech salaries see biggest jump in the US, growing faster than Silicon Valley

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Technology job paychecks grew fastest in Philadelphia this year, according to a new survey of employers and workers by Hired.com. Philadelphia posted the largest growth in average local tech salaries—a nearly 12% increase from $127,000 in 2021 to $142,000 in 2022—compared with 15 other large ...

View more: Philadelphia tech salaries see biggest jump in the US, growing faster than Silicon Valley

Apple starts iPhone 14/14 Plus manufacturing in India

Foxconn's Indian factory is reported to make roughly five percent of the total monthly iPhone manufacturing volume

View more: Apple starts iPhone 14/14 Plus manufacturing in India

Netflix is diving deeper into game development with a new studio

Screengrab via Netflix Netflix isn’t satisfied with just bringing third-party video games to its streaming service as the platform continues to expand its offerings after nearly a year of being available. To insulate that portion of the business, the company is establishing a new internal game studio that will ...

View more: Netflix is diving deeper into game development with a new studio

Setchain, an application that multiplies by a thousand the number of transactions per minute in any blockchain

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers Margarita Capretto, Martin Ceresa (IMDEA Software), Antonio Fernández Anta (IMDEA Networks), Antonio Russo (IMDEA Networks) and César Sánchez (IMDEA Software) presented Setchain, a new data structure that improves the scalability of blockchains, allowing a greater number of transactions per block, which leads to a ...

View more: Setchain, an application that multiplies by a thousand the number of transactions per minute in any blockchain

Blacklisted: Carlos Rodriguez reportedly forced to sell G2 Esports shares by Riot

Photo via Riot Games Carlos Rodriguez has been blacklisted by Riot Games and is being forced to sell his shares in G2 Esports, according to Esportmaniacos. Rodriguez recently stepped down as the CEO of G2 after he posted a video of himself partying with known misogynist and alleged human ...

View more: Blacklisted: Carlos Rodriguez reportedly forced to sell G2 Esports shares by Riot

As pandemic measures are lifted, social media use has declined with the exception of TikTok

DJI Osmo Action 3 review: A great action cam at a decent price

UK: TikTok may face big fine over children's data protection

Apple to make iPhone 14 in India in shift away from China

Netflix and Disney poised to shake up TV ad world

Study finds tactile impressions add product value

Guild Esports signs new all-female team, expands support for women in esports with new partnership

Increased regulatory scrutiny of US-listed Chinese companies could slow M&A activity, Moody’s says

Four terminal perovskite-silicon PV tandem devices hit 30% efficiency

Li Ka-shing’s family feels pinch of depreciating pound as flagship CK Asset bears brunt of sell-off in Hong Kong

Evergrande crisis: receivers put Hong Kong trophy headquarters building on market as lenders run out of patience

Global recession fears and collapse in confidence could turn the dash for cash into a stampede

OTHER TECH NEWS

Top Car News Car News