Summary: A newly developed multidimensional lexicon of emojis helps crack the coded language and emotional value of emoji use, a popular form of communication by young texters, beyond simple negativity or positivity.

Source: University of British Columbia

How much is really known about those smiley faces staring back at from smartphone screens? Anyone who has ever wondered if the people sending them are really that happy is not alone.

Thanks to a pair of UBC Okanagan colleagues, researchers striving to better understand the ever-expanding world of emojis now have a new tool to keep pace with technology—what they call a multidimensional lexicon of emojis (MLE).

Doctoral student Rebecca Godard and Dr. Susan Holtzman, Associate Professor in Psychology at UBC Okanagan have published their findings in a new paper titled “The Multidimensional Lexicon of Emojis: A New Tool to Assess the Emotional Content of Emojis.”

The research appears in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

“As digital platforms evolve, strategies are also evolving to communicate emotion,” Godard says. “We saw that early on with emoticons (precursors to emojis), but emojis have largely taken over that role of facilitating emotional communication. At the same time, research on emojis has lagged behind actual use. Researchers don’t have enough tools for measuring the way people use emojis and the emotions that they communicate.”

While it may be easy to cast off emojis as simple distractions, they belie a hidden language—especially among young people—Godard says. And any researcher studying digital communication will have to account for the emotional information an emoji contains to get a true accounting of the message.

Godard’s MLE can help researchers crack that coded language and the emotions behind it beyond simple negativity and positivity.

Godard analyzed three million Twitter posts and collected emotion ratings of emojis from 2,230 human raters to develop and validate the MLE.

This new lexicon consists of 359 common emojis rated on eight emotions (anger, anticipation, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise, and trust) and the two broader sentiments (positive and negative).

Researchers Create Tool to Measure the Emotion in Emojis

While it may be easy to cast off emojis as simple distractions, they belie a hidden language—especially among young people—Godard says. Image is in the public domain

“A substantial amount of online communication now includes emojis,” says Holtzman, who supervised the findings. “From market to mental health research, we hope this new tool will help everyone better understand the emotions of people communicating online.”

Godard saw the need for the MLE because human communication is changing and growing so rapidly. More people are writing at a higher rate than at any time in history, but often in short bursts through social media, email or text message.

When people speak face to face, they see emotional cues that help translate emotions. When people write letters, they have the luxury of letting the words explain the emotions over paragraphs. In tweets, there are 280 characters.

But people tweet a lot, and much of that is in the public domain. It’s a tantalizing opportunity to study communication, and Godard’s lexicon can help translate. Godard is continuing her Ph.D. at UBCO, and will monitor how useful her MLE remains. She understands the research will need to be updated to keep pace with the quickly changing world of digital communication.

“We know that the meanings of emojis change over time,” says Godard. “We also know how subtle teens can be, in their text messages for example, and how they tend to gravitate toward what’s new.”

About this psychology and communication research news

Author: Press OfficeSource: University of British ColumbiaContact: Press Office – University of British Columbia
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original Research: Open access.
“The Multidimensional Lexicon of Emojis: A New Tool to Assess the Emotional Content of Emojis” by Rebecca Godard et al. Frontiers in Psychology


Abstract

The Multidimensional Lexicon of Emojis: A New Tool to Assess the Emotional Content of Emojis

Emerging studies suggest that emojis can make important contributions to the emotional content and meaning of digital messages. Yet researchers currently lack adequate tools to incorporate emojis into their analyses.

To address this gap, we used over 3 million Twitter posts from a period of 17 months and emotion ratings provided by 2,230 human raters to develop and validate the Multidimensional Lexicon of Emojis (MLE). This new lexicon consists of 359 common emojis rated on ten emotion and sentiment dimensions.

The MLE is an open-access tool that holds promise for those interested in conducting a comprehensive analysis of the emotional content of digital communication that incorporates emojis and goes beyond the dimensions of negativity and positivity.

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